Eddy’s Run

 

By taking a look at different social media such as Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Instagram, and even YouTube, it is evident that many social users are utilizing remix culture and convergence culture as well to support Edward Snowden’s cause. To understand how these multiple users are doing so, it is important to establish the definition of remix and convergence culture as well. Indeed, remix culture can be defined as the process of rearranging an original content to create something unique. Convergence culture can be viewed as the merging of old and new media to form a single entity. When typing Edward Snowden remix on YouTube, there are about 87,700 videos that correspond to the search.

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Many supporters of Edward Snowden used remix culture to show support to their hero. For instance, Weird little Bro is a YouTuber that describes himself as a video maker just for fun. Weird little Bro published a video on January 12, 2014, named Snowden Songified. He describes the video as an entertaining one. He also mentioned that he is a big fan of remix, and he usually does remixes as a hobby. Weird little Bird wanted to encourage people to listen to Snowden himself and understand why the Snowden debate was trending. He believes that the remix could help people understand more Snowden message rather than reading a bunch of articles online. The video is 4:12 minutes long, and it is a remix of Snowden real interview video that was released by The Guardian on their Youtube Page on July 9, 2013. This is the interview that Snowden gave while in Hong Kong on June 6, 2013, and this is the interview that started everything. This video, which is 7:06 long is a portion of the entire interview. Snowden Songified Started with the beginning of the standard interview where Snowden introduces himself to the reporter. It is possible to hear music in the background but nothing that seems other than normal. The original of the video started at 0:17 seconds when Snowden answers the question: Why should people care about surveillance?  In the original video, Snowden answers that question at 7:12 seconds. A fascinating aspect of Weird Little Bro work is obviously how he was able to take pieces of Snowden’s speech and put it together to emphasize the message that Snowden was trying to broadcast. This remix is completely different from the interview, and by watching it, it is almost impossible to have a negative opinion about Snowden. The remix repeats sentences such as  ” Even if you’re not doing anything you’re watch” several times. The music is also catchy, so it is tough not to pay attention to the fact that ” You’re being watch.”  The remix also emphasizes the word ” next generation” to highlight that government spying will get worse, and that is the reason why Snowden should be considered as a hero.picture2

Weird Little Bro has almost 8800 followers, and he got 7167 views which represent an effectiveness of almost 82%. Among all the viewers, he only goes one dislike out of 158 likes. By skimming through the comment section, it turns out that even people who do not like Snowden appreciated the video. Therefore, it seems like Weird Little Bro’s strategy to use remix had a benefit in showing support to Snowden. Weird Little Bro is just an example, out of many, of YouTubers that use the Symphony of Sciences to support Edward Snowden. The Symphony of Sciences is the process of using music remix to divulge scientific knowledge. Besides, some Snowden’s supporters use technological and media convergence to help their “hero.” Many people use their computers not only used for writing, but also for gaming. In the early 2000s’, almost all computers games were requiring a CD-ROM to be played. Now, with the easy access of internet, many games became available online and free. Binji is a German company specialized in the conception of app and video games. This company, which is a huge supporter of Snowden, created a video game named Eddy’s Run.picture3

On the homepage of the game website, a user can be playing, and share the game or if not, he or she can choose the option “What it is” or “Take action.”

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The “What is it” button directs the player to a page where Eddy’s Run is explained. The developer defines the game as “The Story of a True Hero who risked his life and is now on the run from governments and secrets services.”  picture5

By exploring more, it turns out that the “Take Action” button directs the player to a list a website petitions that favor Snowden Pardon by the US president.

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For those who decide to start playing, the main objective of this game is to help Eddy find the reporter so that he can spread the word for him. Whenever Eddy talks to a reporter, he gets four laptops that he can use to fight the security agents. The game starts as Eddy talks to a journalist telling him that he will head to Hong Kong. This reflection can even be taken to a step further by arguing that this game also demonstrates a social convergence. In fact, a search on YouTube for Eddy’s run leads to a video made by What’s This Game (WTG), which is a review of the German Game made by Americans. This video is 44 minutes long by was viewed more than 450 times even though WTG channel only has 40 followers. While showing the viewers how to play the game, the people in the video also show supports to Snowden by explaining how Spying on the population is politically wrong.

Overall, Snowden’s supporters were able to use wisely remix and convergence culture to propagate Snowden’s message. These two ways, in addition to the use of social media like Facebook or Twitter, are what make the Snowden controversy unforgettable.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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